Something Old Into Something New 2—Disco Deco, Part III . . . Materials Matter

Art-Deco-PatternsPaper choice can make or break the look of your invitation suite as well as your budget. It can be quite expensive so you will have to shop around in order to find a paper that is both high quality AND cost effective. I am sharing some of my favorite sources for paper and envelopes that provide a beautiful assortment for all budgets.

Paper For Invitations and Envelopes:
Legion Paper
Gmund
French Paper
Letterpress Paper
The Papermill Store
Paper Source
Paper Works

Specialty Papers for Envelope Liners, etc.:
Hollanders
Paper Wonders
Hiromi Paper
Paper Mojo

MAKE YOUR OWN
I love to custom-line my envelopes and sometimes I even create my own paper pattern. I choose and draw a design in Illustrator and then make a pattern with it. Illustrator CS6 has a new pattern tool that offers different pattern options for you to choose from. Here is a great video that shows you how this works.

An antique Ottoman carpet was the inspiration for my carnation pattern and was a perfect choice since Art Deco is all about symmetry and the exotic. I colored my pattern in the soft gray that our couple requested and printed it out on a digital Japanese paper that I got from Hiromi.

Using an envelope template from Paper Source, I traced and cut out my envelope liners. Then, I placed the paper in the envelope and stuck it down with an archival glue stick.

Deco-3

If you decide to line your own envelopes, make an evening of it. Invite friends and family to help you put your invitation suite together. Make it festive with some good food and fabulous wine and put an assembly line in place. Getting the envelopes done early is always a good idea so that the calligrapher can get started addressing them. That way, they are ready to go when the invitations come back from the printer.

 

Something Old Into Something New 2—Disco Deco

by Patricia Vining

 

Clockwise from top left: Prada Soho Gatsby Exhibition, Tiffany’s Gatsby Windows, The Grand Entrance at Beauty & Essex Restaurant

Clockwise from top left: Prada Soho Gatsby Exhibition, Tiffany’s Gatsby Windows, The Grand Entrance at Beauty & Essex Restaurant

I have been in Los Angeles for the last few days with Jenna. We had the pleasure of meeting with a fabulous and fun couple to discuss their vision, the design of their wedding, and their printed matter. They told us their story as we shared a meal—my favorite part of this job!

 

We have been dying to do an Art Deco wedding with all of this Gatsby mania, and as the couple plans to hold the wedding at an historic Art Deco hotel here in Los Angeles, this is our chance. So let’s start with a recap of what was discussed (I can’t give you all of the details right now, as they are top secret):

 

WeddingBrand Vision Statement
Hollywood Chic juxtaposed by the quaintness of (Secret) City, where whimsical elegance meets a bit of cheekiness at a grand cocktail party . . . all reflected in a disco ball!


Color Ideas
Neutrals – grays, silvers, with pops of gold
Mixed metallics—the bride loves bling so I am thinking foil stamping, hmmmm.

 

The Something Old
Art Deco was an eclectic, design style that originated in Europe in the early 20th Century and flourished until 1940 when it was gradually replaced by the International Style. It became famous following the great Exposition des Arts Modernes Decoratifs et Industriels, held in Paris in 1925 and from which its name evolved. Art Deco, or the Machine Age as it is sometimes referred to, expressed the energy, optimism, and glamour of the roaring twenties; and later, the escapism of the dismal thirties. Art Deco style was a direct reflection of the times—the rapid industrialization of the culture, great archeological discoveries, and major technological advances. Its defining themes were the skyscraper, modern technology, a fascination with the speed and power of modern transport and communications, the new, liberated woman and the breaking of old rules and stereotypes, and the exotic (ancient cultures such as Egypt and Central America). It is characterized by rich colors, bold black and white, neutrals, luxurious metallics, stylized florals and scrolls, geometric shapes, the streamlined or linear, and sumptuous ornamentation.

 

Clockwise from top left: Art Deco Package Collection by Katsu Kimura; La Vie Parisienne, November, 1920; La Ferronnerie Moderne by Henri Clouzot, French Art Deco Wedding (1930) From Harper's Bazaar by Andre Edouard Marty

Clockwise from top left: Art Deco Package Collection by Katsu Kimura; La Vie Parisienne, November, 1920; La Ferronnerie Moderne by Henri Clouzot, French Art Deco Wedding (1930) From Harper’s Bazaar by Andre Edouard Marty

 

Inspiration
I have a small and beautiful collection of Art Deco ephemera and some wonderful images from a recent trip to NYC from which to draw inspiration—I am like a kid in a candy store! I am sharing some of this inspiration here today as we begin our second, Something Old, Into Something New project. In the next week, I will show you how to take these items and transform them into something more contemporary for today’s bride. I love that term “modern” as Deco WAS the hot, modern look in the 20s and 30s. So essentially, we will be modernizing modernism.


So what do we call it? Neo Deco, , Neue Mod, Mod2, what are your thoughts on this topic? We’d love to hear from you.

 

I created a new  DIY Tool – Design a Gorgeous Wedding Invitation containing some of our best invitation design tips. You can download it HERE.

 

Next up in Part II, we will choose contemporary revivals of Deco colors, fonts, and ornament that best reflect the brand vision.